England vs New Zealand live stream: How to watch autumn international online and on TV today

Sign up to our free sport newsletter for all the latest news on everything from cycling to boxing

Sign up to our free sport email for all the latest news

Thanks for signing up to the
Sport email

For the first time since the 2019 Rugby World Cup semi-final, England and New Zealand meet in one of international rugby’s marquee fixtures.

The All Blacks first played England way back in 1905, winning 15-0 that day, and 117 years on they meet in a mouth-watering autumn international match-up where victory for either would do their confidence a huge amount of good.

  • LIVE! Follow coverage of England vs the All Blacks with our blog

That 19-7 victory in Japan in 2019 was perhaps the high point of the Eddie Jones era, with the complete performance that day providing the template that England have been striving for ever since. Less than a year out from the next World Cup, they are desperate for a similar display, or result at least.

Their autumn began with a disheartening 30-29 loss to Argentina and although Japan were dispatched in style a week ago, it is Saturday’s clash with Ian Foster’s All Blacks – who have beaten Japan, Wales and Scotland this month – and the finale against the Springboks that will determine the success of this autumn campaign for Jones and co.

Here’s everything you need to know about the clash:

Recommended



When is England vs New Zealand?

The match will kick off at 5.30pm GMT on Saturday 19 November at Twickenham in London.

How can I watch it?

Like all the 2022 autumn internationals, the match will be shown live on Amazon Prime Video, which can be accessed across a range of digital devices. If you’re not an Amazon Prime Video subscriber start a free 30-day trial here.

What is the team news?

Owen Farrell will become just the third England men’s player to win 100 Test caps on Saturday, joining Ben Youngs and Jason Leonard, as he starts at No.12, outside fly-half Marcus Smith and inside the returning Manu Tuilagi.

Tuilagi is one of three England changes as he takes the place of Guy Porter, while Jack Nowell starts instead of the injured Joe Cokanasiga on the right wing and there’s a shake-up at the back of the pack to allow Billy Vunipola to come into the starting XV at No 8 – Sam Simmonds switching to the blindside and Maro Itoje pushing up into the second row.

Farrell isn’t the only centurion at Twickenham as, back from suspension, Brodie Retallick will become the 12th All Black to reach three figures, while he and Sam Whitelock will also set a new world record for the number of Tests started together in the second row – with Saturday set to be their 64th.

Scott Barrett shifts to flanker to make space for Retallick and the All Blacks have also restored many of the players that beat Wales a fortnight ago as outside centre Rieko Ioane, half-backs Aaron Smith and Richie Mo’unga and front-rowers Codie Taylor and Tyrel Lomax all get the nod.

Line-ups

England XV: 15. Freddie Steward, 14. Jack Nowell, 13. Manu Tuilagi, 12. Owen Farrell, 11. Jonny May, 10. Marcus Smith, 9. Jack van Poortvliet, 1. Ellis Genge, 2. Luke Cowan-Dickie, 3. Kyle Sinckler, 4. Maro Itoje, 5. Jonny Hill, 6. Sam Simmonds, 7. Tom Curry, 8. Billy Vunipola

Replacements: 16. Jamie George, 17. Mako Vunipola, 18. Will Stuart, 19. David Ribbans, 20. Jack Willis, 21. Ben Youngs, 22. Guy Porter, 23. Henry Slade

New Zealand XV: 15. Beauden Barrett, 14. Mark Telea, 13. Rieko Ioane, 12. Jordie Barrett, 11. Caleb Clarke, 10. Richie Mo’unga, 9. Aaron Smith, 1. Ethan de Groot, 2. Codie Taylor, 3. Tyrel Lomax, 4. Brodie Retallick, 5. Samuel Whitelock, 6. Scott Barrett, 7. Dalton Papali’i, 8. Ardie Savea

Replacements: 16. Samisoni Taukei’aho, 17. George Bower, 18. Nepo Laulala, 19. Shannon Frizell, 20. Hoskins Sotutu, 21. TJ Perenara, 22. David Havili, 23. Anton Lienert-Brown

Odds

England: 6/4

Recommended



Draw: 22/1

New Zealand: 8/11

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

{{#verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} {{^verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}}

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

{{#verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} {{^verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}}

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Source: Read Full Article